John Tierney Bio, Age, Family, Wife, Net Worth, Education, Books and Awards

John Tierney Biography

John Tierney(John Marion Tierney) is an American journalist and author who has worked for the New York Times since 1990. A self-described contrarian, he is a critic of aspects of environmentalism, the “science establishment”, big government, and calls for limiting emissions of carbon dioxide.

After graduating from college, he was a newspaper reporter for four years, first at the Bergen Record in New Jersey and then at the Washington Star. Starting in 1980, he spent ten years in magazine journalism writing for such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Discover, Esquire, Health, National Geographic Traveler, New York, Newsweek, Outside, Rolling Stone.

John began working at The New York Times in 1990 as a “general assignment” reporter in the Metro section.[3] Tierney writes a science column, “Findings”, for the Times. He previously wrote the TierneyLab blog for the Times.

In 2005 Tierney began to write for the Times Op-Ed page and as of 2015, his writings appeared in both the Times Op-Ed and “Findings” science column. He also writes for the conservative City Journal.

In 2009 Tierney wrote about mathematics popularizer Martin Gardner and in that same year started featuring recreational mathematics problems, often curated by Pradeep Mutalik in his New York Times TierneyLab blog.

In 2010, Tierney retired from writing the blog, and Mutalik continued it under a new name (NumberPlay). In time, Gary Antonick took that over until he retired it in Oct 2016.

John Tierney Age

John Marion Tierney is an American journalist and author who has worked for the New York Times since 1990. He was born on March 25. 1953. The journalist is 66 years old as of 2019.

John Tierney Family

John pursued his high school education from Sunset High School, graduating in 2002. He later joined the University of Oregon and received a degree in print and broadcast journalism.

In 2014, he joined KGW, an NBC affiliated television station at his hometown Portland and led the investigative and political reporting team of the channel. As of 2019, he serves as an Executive Producer for the KGW 8 news. More details about his parents, brothers, and sisters will be updated soon.

John Tierney Wife

John has married his wife Alison Kinesis on February 20. 2016 after several years of dating. Alison is the president and volunteer for the American Marketing Association, Portland who joined Kinesis Marketing Firm as an executive team leader in 2012.

As of 2019, she serves as a Director of operations in the corporation. On 28th November 2017, John and Alison welcomed their first child as a son named Jude Peter Tierney.

John Tierney Images
John Tierney Images

John Tierney wedding

Their wedding ceremony was held in the Hotel Deluxe in Portland and was witnessed by their family and friends.

The couple exchanged their engagement rings on 3rd September 2015. Browsing through their social account, it is not difficult to discern that the couple was in a dating relationship for several years before they got married.

They enjoyed moments attending events together and visited various sites, which got perpetuated even after their marriage.

John Tierney Net Worth

In 2014, John joined KGW, an NBC affiliated television station at his hometown Portland and led the investigative and political reporting team of the channel. He serves as an Executive Producer for the KGW 8 news.

He has earned a remarkable amount of income from an executive position in the news media. The Payscale suggests that the average salary of an executive tv producer is $93,325 annually. He has an estimated net worth of $1million dollars as of 2019.

John Tierney Education

He graduated from Yale University in 1976 and spent four years as a newspaper reporter, first at the Bergen Record in New Jersey and then at the Washington Star. Starting in 1980, he spent ten years in magazine journalism.

His articles were published in the Atlantic Monthly, Discover, Esquire, Health, National Geographic Traveler, New York, Newsweek, Outside, Rolling Stone, Science 81-86, Vogue, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and the Washington Monthly.

During the 1993-94 academic year, he was a fellow at the Freedom Forum Media Studies Center in New York, researching media coverage of environmental issues.

John Tierney Books

Most Popular Books

  • Key Perspectives in Criminology
  • Criminology: Theory and Context
  • Race, Migration, and Schooling

John Tierney Awards

1998–99, New York News Publishers Association: Distinguished Column Writing Award.
1988– American Association for the Advancement of Science/Westinghouse Science Journalism Award, for a cover story in Newsweek, “The Search for Adam and Eve.”
1983- American Institute of Physics–United States Steel Foundation Science Writing Award.

John Tierney Articles

Findings columns (New York Times Tuesday science section)

Do You Suffer From Decision Fatigue? (New York Times Magazine)

The Real War on Science: The Left has done far more than the Right to set back progress. (City Journal)

The Optimists Are Right (New York Times Magazine)

Technology Makes Us Better; Our Oldest Computer, Upgraded (New York Times Magazine)

Explornography: Going Where A Lot of Other Dudes With Really Great Equipment Have Gone Before (New York Times Magazine)

Recycling Is Garbage (New York Times Magazine)

The Reign of Recycling (2015 update in New York Times Sunday Review) Recycling 1

The Autonomist Manifesto (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Road) (New York Times Magazine)

John Tierney Recycling

Questioning America’s “weird obsession with recycling everything”

In a controversial story headlined “Recycling is Garbage,” New York Times Science columnist John Tierney called recycling “a waste of time and money, a waste of human and natural resources,” setting an all-time record for hate mail at the New York Times Magazine.

Nineteen years later, Tierney revisits the system he trashed in an op-ed titled, “The Reign of Recycling.” Tierney maintains his view, writing, “when it comes to the bottom line, both economically and environmentally, not much has changed at all.”

On “CBS This Morning” Tuesday, Tierney addressed the “weird obsession” and common misconceptions about “recycling everything.”

Tierney acknowledged that some things — including paper, cardboard, and metal — are worth recycling because of their economic and environmental benefits, but not everything is.

“There’s this idea that we should get to a free-waste society — and most stuff in the garbage it’s not that worthwhile to recycle,” Tierney said.

He singled out glass as one example that not only breaks the recycling machinery but is also costly to get rid of because “nobody wants it.”

He also cautioned that even when recycling “worthy” materials, such as plastics, can be easily skewed from a well-meaning attempt to be eco-friendly to a waste of energy, but literally and figuratively.

“To offset the carbon emission from one plane to Europe, you would have to recycle about 40,000 plastic bottles,” Tierney said. “And the savings is so little that if you rinse those bottles in hot water, just a little energy from hot water could offset all the savings and you end up putting more carbon in the atmosphere.”

Tierney also urged that contrary to common belief, there is plenty of open space to deposit the garbage in rural landfills that could ultimately be covered and transformed into parks.

Speaking about his recent trip to a third-grade science classroom, Tierney said he was taken aback by the students’ perception that their garbage was going to “destroy the earth.”

“I think it’s nice to tell kids not to waste things…but I think we’re getting a kind of warped message,” he said. “I wanted to tell them, that yogurt container that you got, all the things in that yogurt container, it came out of the earth…and now we’re going to put it safely back in the earth and we’ll build a park,” he said.

Though maybe not as much as nineteen years ago, Tierney said slamming recycling the second time around still generated some anger.

“It’s hard to persuade people that if you think it’s morally wrong to throw away garbage, I respect that’s a moral opinion,” Tierney said.

John Tierney Twitter