Jeff Struecker Biography, Age, Wife, Somalia, Net Worth, Battles And Wars, Interview

Jeff Struecker Biography

Jeff Struecker born as Jeffery Dean Struecker is an American author, pastor, and previous U.S. Armed force Ranger who was engaged with the Battle of Mogadishu in 1993.

He additionally partook in the 1989 intrusion of Panama (Operation Just Cause)and in Kuwait amid Operation Desert Storm. Struecker has co-written five distributed books.

Jeff Struecker Age

Struecker was born on March 7, 1969, in Fort Dodge, Iowa, United States. He is 50 years old as of 2019

Jeff Struecker Wife

He is a married man. He is married to Dawn. He has five children.

Jeff Struecker Education

She earned the Doctor of Philosophy from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina, a Master of Divinity Degree from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and a Bachelor of Science Degree and Associate of Science Degree from Troy State University in Troy, Alabama.

Jeff Struecker Somalia | Jeff Struecker Battle of Mogadishu

In the 1993 Battle of Mogadishu, Struecker was a 24-year-old Sergeant and squad pioneer doled out to Task Force Ranger as a piece of the 75th Ranger Regiment. He drove the 3-vehicle guard that returned, through the extraordinary flame, injured Ranger Pvt. Todd Blackburn to base. In the film dependent on the fight, Black Hawk Down, Struecker is depicted by Brian Van Holt.

Jeff Struecker Battles And Wars

In the 1993 Battle of Mogadishu, Struecker was a 24-year-old Sergeant and squad pioneer appointed to Task Force Ranger as a piece of the 75th Ranger Regiment. He drove the 3-vehicle escort that returned, through the serious flame, injured Ranger Pvt. Todd Blackburn to base.

In the film dependent on the fight, Black Hawk Down, Struecker is depicted byEnlisted in the Army in September 1987 at 18 years old, Struecker served ten years in the 75th Ranger Regiment in positions going from Ranger Reconnaissance Specialist to Platoon Sergeant. He would proceed to win the Best Ranger Competition in 1996 with accomplice SPC Isaac Gmazel. Brian Van Holt.

Promptly following his retirement from the military, Struecker joined the staff of Calvary Baptist Church in Columbus, Georgia and turned into its lead minister in April 2014. Struecker and his family had been individuals from the congregation since 2007. Struecker has likewise kept on writing books and he talks consistently to groups of onlookers over the United States about his encounters and about his Christian confidence

Jeff Struecker Net Worth

He has made a good fortune from his career. He has an estimated net worth of around $9,229,935( this is not actual)

Jeff Struecker Church

Quickly following his retirement from the military, Struecker joined the staff of Calvary Baptist Church in Columbus, Georgia and turned into its lead minister in April 2014. Struecker and his family had been individuals from the congregation since 2007. Struecker has additionally kept on composing books and he talks routinely to gatherings of people over the United States about his encounters and about his Christian confidence.

Jeff Struecker Twitter

Jeff Struecker Books

The Road To Unafraid: How the Army’s Top Ranger Faced Fear and Found Courage through Black Hawk Down and Beyond (2006)
Certain Jeopardy (2009)
Blaze of Glory: A Novel (2010)
Fallen Angel: A Novel (2011)
Hide and Seek: A Novel (2012)

Jeff Struecker Interview

Army Ranger Hall of Famer Jeff Struecker: ‘My faith gave me this sense of peace’

Here are excerpts of that interview, edited for length and clarity.

Q: What was your reaction when you got a call and said, “Hey, we’re putting you in the Ranger Hall of Fame.”

A: I was quite shocked that anybody wanted to nominate me, mainly because I had kind of two distinct lifetimes in the Rangers. One of them was as an enlisted guy and then the other was as a chaplain. Well, chaplains are generally not the kind of people you would assume would make it to the Hall of Fame. I was quite surprised to be nominated and felt certain that I would not get selected.

Q: Who nominated you?

A: Mark Winton, the chaplain of the Airborne Ranger Training Brigade. One of the things that I said to Mark about the nomination is, “This is a great honor just to be nominated.” I never assumed that a chaplain would be nominated. I was certain that it wouldn’t go beyond the nomination. It took the ARTB a lot of work just to put my packet together and to put my packet forward.

Q: What does it mean to you to go in?

A: Well, in order to properly answer that question, let me tell you a little bit about my love for the Ranger community. As you know, I showed up in the Army here at Fort Benning at 18. I went through basic training, AIT, went straight to the Ranger Regiment as a private. My first six months, nine months were brutal. They’re brutal for everybody in the Ranger Regiment. It was so tough that I pretty much thought, “I don’t think I’m good enough to be able to hang with these guys.”

Jeff Struecker Photo
Jeff Struecker Photo

… It was so rough those first nine months that I was fairly sure “I’m not good enough to be able to make it in this unit.” I was, like, “I’m gonna give it everything that I’ve got, every day. But, I don’t think I’m good enough to make it to this unit.”

… After about nine months or so, they started saying, “Jeff, we think you’re ready for Ranger School.” I got sent to Ranger School within my first year in the Ranger Regiment. By the time that I got finished with the Ranger School and I started to understand a few things about being a leader in the Ranger Regiment and the kind of demands that the country was gonna make of me as a Ranger leader, I fell in love with it. Literally, my first year or year and a half in the Army, I hated the Army. I hated Fort Benning. I couldn’t wait to get out. By my third or fourth year, I just wanted to spend the rest of my life doing this.

Q: What changed, Jeff, between that first year and then that third or fourth year?

A: I wish I could tell you. I can’t point to any one thing. Successfully completed Ranger School, becoming a non-commissioned officer, having some leadership opportunities — all of those things were different. But I don’t think that’s really what changed. I think I finally got a chance to see what the Rangers provide to the country. I finally understood at the broadest level who these men really are.

When I started understanding the kind of people that are leaders in the Ranger Regiment, every day I got up and thought to myself, “Man, I get the privilege of working with the greatest men in the world — not just in America but some of the greatest men in the world.” There weren’t many days that I got up and went to work that I didn’t try to live up to the expectations that they would have of me.

Q: What made these people the greatest?

A: Commitment, dedication, sense of duty. I watched the kind of sacrifice that any business in the world would give their right arm to have leaders that are that good, making that kind of sacrifices. And they were doing it for each other and they were doing it for the country.

Q: You find yourself in Mogadishu in the middle of something that went terribly wrong. You’d been in the Army how long at that point?

A: Six years, and I was a squad leader in Bravo Company, 3rd Ranger Battalion when we deployed from here to Task Force Ranger in Somalia, Operation Gothic Serpent.

Before I answer any more questions about that, though, can I go back to what made this such a great honor?

Source: ledger-enquirer.com