Who is Emily Warren?

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Emily Warren Biography

Emily Warren born Emily Warren Schwartz is an American singer and songwriter signed to Dr. Luke’s label Prescription Songs. She is known for writing songs for several high profile artists such as The chainsmokers, Dua Lipa, Khalid, Sigrid and Shawn Mendez. She was born on 25th August 1992 in New York. 

Emily Warren Age

Emily was born on August 25th, 1992 ( she is 26 years old as of 2018 )

Emily Warren Boyfriend|Married

Emily has kept her love life private from the public eye. It will be updated soon once we get some info.

Emily Warren Education

Emily was raised on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, where she attended the preparatory school Trinity, from kindergarten through high school. She was accepted into the NYU Tisch School/Clive Davis Institute in 2011 and offered and was offered a songwriter’s contract with Prescription (Rx) Songs in 2013. In 2015 she graduated from the university and began splitting her time between Los Angeles and London.

Emily Warren Career

Emily from a young age had a penchant for the creativity and she performed regularly with her band, Emily Warren & the Betters members Etienne Bowler and Marc Campbell went on to form part of the pop band MisterWives. A single from their EP  was featured on  MTV’s short-lived series, Skins.

After signing with Dr. Luke, Emily disbanded the Betters and spent a year in LA. Soon after her arrival, she co-wrote “Masterpiece”, the third single on Jessie J’s album, Sweet Talker. “Masterpiece” debuted at number 30 on the US Mainstream Top 40 and number 65 on Billboard Hot 100, it was also certified gold in Australia and New Zealand.

Following the success of that release, she eventually teamed up with longtime friend and collaborator Scott Harris to co-write four songs from Shawn Mendes’ platinum-selling album, Handwritten: “Strings”, “Aftertaste”, “Air” and “Lost”. September 18, 2015, marked the release of The Chainsmokers’ and Tritonal’s “Until You Were Gone”, which featured Warren’s lead vocals. Her performance was immediately praised by Nylon, which wrote: “Her delivery is filled with a longing that packs a strong punch.

The Chainsmokers hailed Emily as one of the best songwriters and vocalists that they had ever worked with. She teamed up with Scott Harris and wrote Don’t Let Me Down with The Chainsmokers. It reached no. 3 and reached triple Platinum in the United States. This was both  The Chainsmokers and Daya’s first top 5 on Billboard Hot 100. Don’t Let Me Down was also nominated and won a Grammy in 2017 for Best Dance Recording.

She again wrote and featured on the vocals of Capsize” with Los Angeles duo Frenship, which is certified platinum and has surpassed 400 million streams on Spotify.  April 7, 2017, American electronic pop duo The Chainsmokersreleased their debut album, Memories…Do Not Open. Warren was credited as a writer on four songs, including “The One”, “Don’t Say”, “My Type” and “Wake Up Alone”. She was additionally featured as lead vocalist on “Don’t Say” and “My Type” and provided uncredited backup vocals on “Paris”.

May 5, 2017, Emily released her debut single, “Hurt By You”, which was on both the US Viral and Global Viral charts on Spotify. July 21, 2017, she released her second single, “Something To Hold On To”, which was also featured on Spotify’s New Music Friday playlist. Her most recent single, “Poking Holes”, was released on October 12, 2017.

Emily was named  Warren was named as one of the Forbes 30 under 30 in the music industry. The list, according to Forbes, is an “annual encyclopedia of creative disruption featuring 600 stars from 20 different industries.” Skylar Grey, one of the judges on the panel that selected Ms. Warren, said she was selected in part because, “Her sound and style of writing is so fresh, and I find a lot of other writers trying to emulate it. She’s young, but she’s been in the game for a while, so this isn’t some flash-in-the-pan writer. I think she’ll be killing it for a long time.

Emily Warren  Photo

Emily Warren Photo

Emily warren songs

Capsize
Berlin Tag & Nacht: Party & Feiern 2017 · 2016
Hurt By You
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Something To Hold On To
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Paranoid
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Poking Holes
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Symmetry
2018
How It Ends
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Just Click
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Not Ready To Dance
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Quite Like This
The Get Down · 2016
As Long As I’m Alive
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Say It
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Like That
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
The Point
Quiet Your Mind · 2018
Already Gone
2017
Ultra South Africa 2017
2017

Emily warren Riverdale

Emily warren hurt by you

 

Emily Warren Networth

Emily`s net worth is still under review it will be updated soon.

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Emily Warren Interview

FROM HITS TO HEART: A CONVERSATION WITH EMILY WARREN

ATWOOD MAGAZINE: CAN YOU START BY TALKING A LITTLE BIT ABOUT MUSIC IN YOUR LIFE? HOW DID THE LOVE OF WRITING BEGIN? WHEN DID YOU NOTICE YOU WERE DRAWN TO POP MUSIC?

Emily Warren: My love of music came from my dad. Although he’s a lawyer, he has had a band together since college that play 60s covers around New York and were always playing in my house growing up. If not the band, my dad was playing guitar and singing to us. Eventually, a piano teacher I had named Jen Bloom, taught me about songwriting – before her I don’t think I fully realized that people wrote songs. After that clicked, I became obsessed. I started really focusing on writing and noticing the writing in the music I was listening to – structure, lyrics, melody, storytelling. I’ve learned most of what I know from listening to music that I love.

WAS IT DIFFICULT TO EMBRACE YOUR CREATIVITY IN A STRUCTURED SCHOOLING ENVIRONMENT?

Emily Warren: In many ways, yes. I went to a very academically rigorous high school where it was hard to find time to make music and develop the band I had started. Although, sometimes I think that the fact that it wasn’t easy is what taught me my drive and motivation. I felt like I had something to prove and that made me work ten times harder. However, I think it would, in general, serve many schools to cultivate creativity instead of trying to suppress it. Academia isn’t for everyone, and I don’t think that a creative career path is any less legitimate, nor should it be treated as such. Fortunately, since graduating, my school has changed a lot – I just learned that they added a songwriting program for high school students!

CAN YOU SPEAK ON YOUR FIRST ENCOUNTERS WITH WRITING SUCCESS? WHEN DID YOU KNOW IT WAS SOMETHING YOU COULD REALLY DO AS A CAREER? HOW DID THAT FEEL?

Emily Warren: I think that the first time I encountered success was when the songs that I was writing started getting cut. Although the first several songs were not particularly successful, you notice that your name gets out there and the ball starts rolling. One session leads to the next, and that’s how you sort of work your way up. When I started being able to support myself off the money I was making purely from songwriting, that was a real moment. It’s pretty crazy that something not only fun and exciting but in many ways necessary to my well-being, can also be a source of income. That’s a crazy feeling, and to this day that is still how I would define success – being able to wake up in the morning and do what I love.

YOU’VE WORKED WITH ARTISTS LIKE THE CHAINSMOKERS AND SHAWN MENDES. HOW HAVE THOSE HIT SONG EXPERIENCES SHAPED HOW YOU WRITE AND INSPIRED YOUR OWN ARTISTRY?

Emily Warren: I’ve been pretty lucky in the sense that the songs of mine that have done particularly well are those in which I was honest and vulnerable, and didn’t necessarily try to chase a sound or anything like that. The benefit of this is that it’s taught me to trust my instinct, and follow my gut – I try not to worry about what should work and just do what feels right.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO RELEASE YOUR OWN MUSIC AND LEND YOUR VOCALS TO SOME OF THE SONGS YOU WRITE? HAS IT BEEN A GOAL OF YOURS FROM THE START, OR IS IT SOMETHING THAT GREW AS YOU BECAME A NOTABLE WRITER?

Emily Warren: I think deep down I always had the bug in me, since I started off as an artist and then transitioned into songwriting. But what made the transition organic and smooth was when people started leaving my voice on songs. After “Until You Were Gone” with The Chainsmokers x Tritonal, and “Capsize” with Frenship, it felt like I could start telling my story and putting out my own songs.

YOUR LATEST RELEASE, “POKING HOLES,” IS A VOCALLY-CENTERED POP TUNE. CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WRITING IT AND WHAT THE TRACK MEANS TO YOU? WHERE DID THAT INSPIRATION COME FROM? WAS IT AN EASY SONG TO WRITE?

Emily Warren: I wrote “Poking Holes” with two of my really good friends Scott Harris and Nick Ruth. We were having a long conversation (where, I think, all the best songs come from) and I said the phrase “poking holes” and we were like… hang on.. that’s pretty sick. The song was fairly easy to write as it came from a very specific memory, a moment in time, and what I love about how it turned out is that I think between the melody and the production, the emotion I associate with that memory is really quite perfectly captured.

YOU’VE GOT A FULL-LENGTH ALBUM TO BE RELEASED IN 2018. CAN YOU TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT IT?

Emily Warren: Yeah! I’m really excited! I find sometimes in a singles-based climate that in lots of cases, I miss getting an album from artists with some songs that are slower or more creatively experimental, songs that have no intention of being “hits”… the track 8’s of the world. That’s really what’s driving me to put out an album. I want a collection of music for people to sink into, should they want to. So, while the songs all have the common thread of being honest and true stories, I hope that each track can serve a different function and that they can come together and mean something as a whole.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT RELEASING YOUR FIRST PERSONAL LP? DO YOU FEEL IT’S A BETTER REPRESENTATION OF YOU PERSONALLY THAN SOME OF THE SONGS YOU HAVE A VOICE IN?

Emily Warren: My approach to writing for myself and others is similar in the sense that it always starts with a conversation and in the best cases ends up landing somewhere vulnerable and honest. However, when I’m in the room with someone else, it’s their story. With this album, it’s mine. I do think that’s largely what’s driven me to do it, is that I reached a certain point where I felt like there were things I wanted to say, things I could only say myself.

WHAT DO YOU HOPE LISTENERS GET OUT OF YOUR SONGS? IN YOUR PERSONAL REPERTOIRE, IS THERE A MESSAGE YOU’RE HOPING TO SEND?

Emily Warren: What I hope to do for listeners is what music has repeatedly done for me. You know that feeling you get when you listen to a song that perfectly describes something you’re going through, and you wonder how someone you’ve never met could know you so well, and you inherently feel less alone? That’s what I’m going for.

WHAT CAN LISTENERS EXPECT FROM YOU IN THE UPCOMING MONTHS AND YEAR?

Emily Warren: I’m still doing lots of writing with other artists, so I have a few exciting things coming out in the next few months, as well as more songs and music videos from me! We’re actually shooting a music video for “Poking Holes” this month which I’m really excited about!

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